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Every woman is different. So are her experiences of pregnancy. Not every woman has the same symptoms or even the same symptoms from one pregnancy to the next.

Also, because the early symptoms of pregnancy are often like what happens right before and during menstruation, those symptoms aren't always recognized.

A few days after conception, the fertilized egg attaches itself to wall of the uterus. This can cause one of the earliest signs of pregnancy -- spotting and, sometimes, cramping.

That's called implantation bleeding. It occurs anywhere from six to 12 days after the egg is fertilized.

The cramps resemble menstrual cramps, so some women mistake them and the bleeding for the start of their period. The bleeding and cramps, however, are slight.

Breast changes are another very early sign of pregnancy. A woman's hormone levels rapidly change after conception. Because of the changes, her breasts may become swollen, sore, or tingly a week or two later. Or they may feel heavier or fuller or feel tender to the touch. The area around the nipples, called the areola, may also darken.


Other things could cause breast changes. But if the changes are an early symptom of pregnancy, keep in mind that it is going to take several weeks to get used to the new levels of hormones. But when it does, breast pain should ease up.

Feeling very tired is normal in pregnancy, starting early on.

A woman can start feeling unusually fatigued as soon as one week after conceiving.

Why? It's often related to a high level of a hormone called progesterone, although other things -- such as lower levels of blood sugar, lower blood pressure, and a boost in blood production -- can all contribute.

If fatigue is related to pregnancy, it's important to get plenty of rest. Eating foods that are rich in protein and iron can help offset it.

Morning sickness is a famous symptom of pregnancy. But not every pregnant woman gets it.

The exact cause of morning sickness is not known but pregnancy hormones likely contribute to this symptom. Nausea during pregnancy may occur at any time of the day but most commonly in the morning.

The most obvious early symptom of pregnancy -- and the one that prompts most women to get a pregnancy test -- is a missed period. But not all missed or delayed periods are caused by pregnancy.

Also, women can experience some bleeding during pregnancy. If you are pregnant, ask your doctor what you should be aware of with bleeding. For example, when is bleeding normal and when is it a sign of an emergency?

Pregnancy brings changes in your hormonal balance. And that can cause other symptoms..

· Frequent urination - For many women, this starts around the sixth or eighth week after conception. Although this could be caused by a urinary tract infection, diabetes, or overusing diuretics, if you're pregnant, it's most likely due to hormonal levels.

· Constipation - During pregnancy, higher levels of the hormone progesterone can make you constipated. Progesterone causes food to pass more slowly through your intestines. To ease the problem, drink plenty of water, exercise, and eat plenty of high-fiber foods.

· Mood swings - These are common, especially during the first trimester. These are also related to changes in hormones.

· Headaches and back pain - Many pregnant women report frequent mild headaches, and others experience chronic back pain.

· Dizziness and fainting - These may be related to dilating blood vessels, lower blood pressure, and lower blood sugar.

A pregnant woman could have all of these symptoms, or maybe have only one or two. If any of these symptoms become bothersome, talk with your doctor about them so you can make a plan to offset them.

A pregnancy test will give you assurance on pregnancy and you can purchase a pregnancy test in a pharmacy near to your place and it has all the instructions you need. This is one of the easy and popular method in all over the world. You can buy a pregnancy test locally at Healthguard pharmacy.

3. Is it safe to have sex during pregnancy period?

Most women who are having a normal pregnancy may continue to have sex right up until their water breaks or they go into labor. There are some circumstances, in that case you can get clarified from your midwife or doctor whether you have – or develop – any complications that make sex a no-go. If you're uncertain, ask your practitioner.

Normally intercourse does not hurt or harm the baby. a baby isn't hurt when a pregnant woman and her partner make love. The amniotic sac and the strong muscles of the uterus protect the baby, and the thick mucus plug that seals the cervix helps guard against infection. During intercourse, the penis doesn't go beyond the vagina, so it won't reach the baby.

There's a wide range of individual experiences when it comes to sexual desire during pregnancy. Some women have a heightened libido throughout pregnancy, while others find they're less interested in sex. Many women find that their sexual appetite fluctuates, perhaps depending on how they're otherwise feeling physically and emotionally.

You may feel too tired, moody, or nauseated to make love, especially in the first trimester. It's not unusual to feel overwhelmed by the physical and emotional changes you're going through. But take heart – you may find that your libido returns in the second trimester after morning sickness and fatigue have eased up.

It's normal to feel some cramping during or just after intercourse or orgasm, but if it doesn't go away after a few minutes, or if you have any pain or bleeding after sex, call your doctor immediately.

Don't hesitate to talk to your doctor or midwife whenever you have any questions or concerns about sex, particularly if you're unsure whether you need to abstain or have fears about the baby's safety. If you are told to stop having sex, make sure you understand whether you need to avoid penetration or orgasm or both.

Author: Dr Chaminda Kandauda

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